Thomson Meier & King

Patricia A. King named Georgia Juvenile Court Attorney of the Year

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Patricia A. King with First Lady of Georgia, Sandra Deal

Attorney Patricia A. King was recently named the Georgia Juvenile Court Attorney of the Year at the Georgia Conference on Children and Families (GCCF) in Augusta, recognizing her work in the area of child advocacy.  GCCF is the largest annual interdisciplinary event in Georgia designed to bring together communities across the state serving children and families.  Ms. King was awarded the honor by First Lady of Georgia Sandra Deal.

Welcome, Rachel D. Conley, to the firm!

Thompson, Meier & King, P.C. is pleased to announce the addition of Rachel D. Conley as an associate attorney. Ms. Conley received a dual degree in Political Science and Spanish from the University of Georgia and obtained her Juris Doctorate from the Mercer University, Walter F. George School of Law. She served as a judicial intern for two judges in Macon before becoming a judicial staff attorney to Hon. David L. Cannon, Jr., in the Superior Court of Cherokee County, where she served for three years prior to joining Thompson, Meier & King. Ms. Conley concentrates her practice in the area of domestic and family law.

Two of our attorneys helped coach Mock Trial

The Cherokee High School Mock Trial had another successful year competing against high schools across North Georgia. This year’s team was coached by Judge David Cannon, Jr., Ashley Carlile, Esq. and Cynthia Propst, Esq. The mock trial team placed third in this year’s Regional Mock Trial Competition, held at the Bartow County Courthouse on January 30th, 2016. The team also won three outstanding attorney awards and four outstanding witness awards at the Regional Competition. As a result of the win, the team advanced to the District Competition, which took place on January 27th, 2016 at the Bartow County Courthouse. The team advanced past the first level of the District Competition but was ultimately eliminated in the second round of the single elimination competition. The team still managed to bring home one attorney award and one witness award from the competition.

King, Meier named among legal world’s ‘Elite’

John-Meier trish-kingPassion for practicing law is just one quality that boosted two Canton attorneys to the top. John Meier and Patricia King, who are partners in the Canton law firm of Thompson, Meier and King PC, recently were selected for inclusion in Legal Elite by Georgia Trend Magazine.

The attorneys were named as elite members of the legal field after a peer-review process where thousands of attorneys, who are members of the state bar, voted for the top attorneys in 10 different practices.

Meier was named Legal Elite in estate planning, and King was named Legal Elite in family law.

“I have to admit I was pleased to learn that my peers thought highly of me,” Meier said. “This also helped encourage me to continue pursuing my passion and broaden the services we provide so that we can be of greater assistance.”

King shared a similar sentiment.

“It was truly an honor,” she said of being named in Legal Elite. “However, I have the privilege of working with so many wonderful attorneys and staff that any accolades I may receive is really the result of a concerted effort.”

King, who has practiced family law since 1989, said going to law school was not a venture she had thought to pursue until graduating from college.

“I received my (bachelor of science) in psychology and criminal justice and was focusing my career on working with troubled teens,” she said.

It was an internship with a Connecticut juvenile probation department that opened King’s eyes to attending law school.

“I realized what a hard road many young people were faced with once they entered the system, whether it was because they committed a crime or because their parents could not care for them,” she said. “That’s when I decided to go to law school. After I graduated from law school, I entered private practice for a number of years but was offered the opportunity to become a child welfare attorney for the state of Florida.”

King’s career took off after that and with 15 years of experience in the courtroom, her passion for family law remains just as strong as it was when she started on her career path.

“Generally, family law deals with a number of family related matters, such as child welfare, adoption, delinquency, termination of parental rights as well as divorce, annulments, paternity and legitimization and issues tied to those matters,” she said.

“I knew very little about this practice until I became a child welfare attorney in Florida, and then it took off from there. I knew this was what I was supposed to be doing,” King said.

Meier said he enjoys practicing estate planning, which, he added, encompasses many different parts of the law.

“Certainly, it involves planning for the efficient transfer of assets in accordance with one’s wishes after death.  However, it also involves assisting clients with their long-term goals before death,” he said. “This can involve issues related to long-term health care, business succession, incompetence and planning for the care of a spouse or other loved ones, just to mention a few.”

Meier started his career as an attorney in 1985 and said he was inspired to pursue law by his friend’s father.

“However, I also grew up working on family farms. I went to college and furthered my love for farming and the family farm,” he said. “I was fortunate to have been hired by the University of Georgia’s Agricultural Economics Department (I ,think it is now the College of Environmental Sciences) after graduating. I worked for four years with UGA as an economic research associate. I spent those years working with hundreds of family farmers and agribusinesses across the state.”

When Meier was an economic research associate, he said it was a time of ultra-high inflation and oil embargos.

“I saw way too many families displaced from the only life they knew and lose assets that had been in their families for generations,” he said. “During this time my father died, and I was uncertain about the future of our farms. I decided that pursuing a career as an attorney assisting families and businesses build, retain and pass along assets was a way I could help others. Things have kind of morphed from there.”

Since embarking on a career that helps others plan for the future, Meier said one of his greatest accomplishments is “providing comfort to someone in a time of turmoil or anxiety.”

“This may not be a big accomplishment in terms of its effect on others but, for that person or family, it was one of the most important things in their life,” he said. “I believe my biggest blessing is my family.”

King said her greatest accomplishment is not tangible.

“I love what I do and the people I work with,” she said. “I have asked myself more than once, ‘how did I get so blessed, especially when it comes to the people in my office?’”

Similar to any career, there is always room for improvement.

pic-4-1aMeier said he encourages growth through professionalism in the courtroom.

“Fiduciary dispute matters are almost always complicated by very strong emotions,” he said. “In my opinion, attorneys certainly need to be zealous advocates for their clients, but they also should act in ways to try and maintain the focus on the client’s goals while endeavoring to limit the often adverse impact of decisions made based on emotion rather than reason or prudence.”

King agreed, adding that because family law matters can be highly emotional, she strives to treat everyone involved with respect.

“That’s not to say that I have achieved perfection in this area, although I can aim to do so one day,” she added.

 

The above news story was written by Jessica Lindley and published in the Cherokee Ledger News. The story can be found online here.